Whatever else might be said about inerrancy, once Scripture is seen fundamentally as a means of bringing us into a personal encounter with the Christ of the gospel story, the need for inerrancy wanes. While Scripture would have to be reliable *overall* as a witness to God’s redemptive work in order to mediate a transformative encounter with Christ, such reliability does not demand that every passage be inerrant, and it certainly does not demand that every passage be inerrant, and it certainly does not require that the plain sense of each passage be prima facie correct. If the heart of Scripture is the message that God has acted in history through Christ to save a fallen humanity and reconcile the world to Himself–and if the purpose of the Scriptures is to mediate a personal encounter with this saviour who was not defeated by death and so is not merely a character in history but a living presence in whom we can place our trust–then the question of whether, for instance, Samson really slew a thousand Philistine soldiers wielding nothing but a donkey’s jawbone becomes of little importance.

– from God’s Final Victory, p. 63

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Eric Reitan and John Kronen on inerrancy

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